VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 23: Summer 1994

In episode 23 of Video Wizards, we return to the year 1994 to bask in the sunrays of the summer, for another seasonal spectacular. With the midpoint of the ’90s just one year away and the ’80s now full and well behind us, we find ourselves in a period of cultural turmoil, where the arcade industry, the music industry AND the film industry seem to lack a general direction and focus and throw a lot at the wall to see what sticks. In the arcades, we deal with the hodge podge of flat shaded polygonal experiments Wing War and Desert Tank by SEGA and Midway’s bizarre attempt to put aging rockers Aerosmith forward as dangerous symbols of youth culture that need to be silenced by a sinister fascist government in the lightgun shooter Revolution X. Atari, meanwhile, goes full stop motion animation for the feral fighter Primal rage, as we can still count on Capcom and SNK to deliver noteworthy, quality fighting games in the shape of Darkstalkers and the first entry in the The King of Fighters series.

And what about those other industries? The pop charts in the UK and the Netherlands are generally a mess, but there is a lot of solid music being made in the scenes of Hip-Hop and metal. And in theaters we see more scattershot releases, with a massive, animated movie centered around a family of lions by Disney, a bit of 20th century history viewed through the eyes of a lovable simpleton who has a knack for cutting to the core of things and the comedic exploits of a band called The Lone Rangers, as they take a radio station hostage to get their demo played on air.

With the Atari Jaguar out on shelves and a new generation of CD-based consoles around the corner, all bets are off when it comes to this chaotic period in the late-early nineties. But these are still simpler times, and we invite you into their comforting, sun drenched embrace, for the next 6 and a half hours.

Wing War

By http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=thumbs&db=&id=1368, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45394221

Revolution X

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24918181

Darkstalkers: The Night Warriors

By Capcom - http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=flyer&db=videodb&id=276&image=1, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41639608

Desert Tank

Primal Rage

May be found at the following website: The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24936497

The King of Fighters '94

By SNK - https://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=thumbs&db=videodb&id=3456, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=65224308
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 20, L-R-T-B: Wing War, Revolution X, Darkstalkers: The Night Warriors, Desert Tank, Primal Rage, The King of Fighters ’94

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Baller of the Month Jingle composed by Yuli Anna and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2022 Yuli Anna, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • Cracking! (Stage 4) – by Tamayo Kawamoto / Zuntata for RayForce, 1994
  • Title / Yak 141 – by Tomoyuki Kawamura for Wing War, 1994
  • Wake Up! & Up Against the Wall – by Chris Granner for Revolution X, 1994
  • Felicia’s Theme – by Takayuki Iwai & Hideki Okugawa for Darkstalkers: The Night Warriors, 1994
  • The Cove – by Jeanne Parson for Primal Rage, 1994
  • Napolitan Blues – by Masahiko Hataya, Bros.Hige, Pearl Sibakiti & Akihiro Uchida for The King of Fighters ’94, 1994
  • Brinstar (Underground Depths) – by Kenji Yamamoto & Minako Hamano for Super Metroid, 1994
  • Stress – by Organized Konfusion, 1994
  • Regulate – by Warren G featuring Nate Dogg, 1994
  • Props Over Here – by The Beatnuts, 1994
  • Under the Sun – by Terminator X & The Godfathers of Threatt featuring Joe Sinistr, 1994
  • Represent – by Grand Daddy I.U., 1994
  • Where My Homiez? – by Ill Al Skratch, 1994
  • Oh My God (Remix) – by A Tribe Called Quest, 1994
  • Wrong Side Of Da Tracks – by Artifacts, 1994
  • Tears of the Dragon – by Bruce Dickinson, 1994
  • Vasoline – by Stone Temple Pilots, 1994
  • Get Your Gunn – by Marilyn Manson, 1994
  • Davidian – by Machine Head, 1994
  • Faster – by Manic Street Preachers, 1994
  • Live Forever – by Oasis, 1994
  • 100% Pure Love – by Crystal Waters, 1994
  • Dissident – by Pearl Jam, 1994
  • Big Time Sensuality – by Björk, 1994
  • Bombtrack – by Rage Against The Machine, 1993
  • Feel What You Want – by Kristine W, 1994
  • Liar – by Rollins Band, 1994
  • Te Land, Ter Zee en in de Lucht Leader (1994) – by Hans van Eijck, 1994
  • No Mean City (Theme from Taggart) – by Mike Moran, 1985

Episode edited by: Juli Reed & Michiel Kroder

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 22: May 1988

In episode 22 of Video Wizards, we find ourselves in the glorious year of 1988, where the 2D shoot ’em up still reigned supreme as the most dominant video game genre. In the arcades we see releases of heavy hitters like Vulcan Venture a.k.a. Gradius II by Konami, Forgotten Worlds by Capcom and Silkworm by Tecmo, the three of them pushing boundaries and technology all in their own particular way. And then there is the oddball 1 versus 1 brawler Kageki by Kaneko, taking super deformed fisticuffs to new extremes.

In terms of gaming at home, SEGA and Nintendo are continuing their efforts to break the choke hold that micros like the ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Commodore C64 and MSX have over the European game industry, with their 8-bit consoles. Music, meanwhile, is in a very interesting place, as Hip Hop has landed in its most revolutionary era and a line is drawn in the sand, glam rockers Poison are trying to stink up metal, while Judas Priest and Living Colour fight back, and the charts are incredibly varied, with a bit of a theme of sociopolitical engagement running through more than one song. We also look at the successes and failings of the mega expensive silver screen blockbusters Willow and Rambo III and delve into some interesting stories from the world of television at the time.

What relevant movie quote does editor Juli drop in the middle of this month’s Video Wizards Quiz? Can Ben hold it together as Michiel drops yet more culturally significant Dutch TV personality names? Does the fact that Gradius II is the main arcade game talking point this month lead to a rift between Michiel and Ben? Will doors be slammed and angry letters be written? Find out in a new 5 and a half hours Video Wizards throwback audio tour extravaganza!

Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou

By http://caesar.logiqx.com/php/game_group.php?id=gradius2, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15135005

Forgotten Worlds

By http://caesar.logiqx.com/php/game_group.php?id=gradius2, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15135005

Silkworm

Kageki
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 20, L-R: Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou, Forgotten Worlds, Silkworm, Kageki

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Baller of the Month Jingle composed by Yuli Anna and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2022 Yuli Anna, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Theme from Butsuzou – by Masahiko Ishida for Ninja Spirit, 1988
  • Burning Heat – by Shinji Tasaka, Motoaki Furukawa, Kenichi Matsubara & Seiichi Fukami for Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou, 1988
  • A Shooting Star – by Shinji Tasaka, Motoaki Furukawa, Kenichi Matsubara & Seiichi Fukami for Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou, 1988
  • Stage Four – by Tamayo Kawamoto & Yoshihiro Sakaguchi for Forgotten Worlds, 1988
  • Main Theme – by ??? for Silkworm, 1988
  • Street Theme – by Hirokazu Tanaka for Gumshoe, 1986
  • My Philosophy – by BDP, 1988
  • Just Got Paid – by Johnny Kemp, 1988
  • Run’s House – by Run-D.M.C., 1988
  • Keep Risin’ to the Top – by Doug E. Fresh and the Get Fresh Crew, 1988
  • I’m Still #1 – by BDP, 1988
  • Are You Ready for Freddy – by Fat Boys (featuring Robert Englund), 1988
  • Every Rose Has Its Thorn – by Poison, 1988
  • Cult of Personality – by Living Colour, 1988
  • Ram it Down – by Judas Priest, 1988
  • Blue Monday – by New Order, 1983
  • Theme from S’Express – by S’Express, 1988
  • Everywhere – by Fleetwood Mac, 1987
  • Yé Ké Yé Ké – by Mory Kanté, 1987
  • Beds Are Burning – by Midnight Oil, 1988
  • Alphabet St. – by Prince, 1988
  • Preparations – by Jerry Goldsmith for the motion picture Rambo III, 1988
  • Theme from M.A.S.K. – by Shuki Levy & Haim Saban, 1985

Episode edited by: Juli Reed & Michiel Kroder

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 21: April 1995

In episode 21 of Video Wizards, we return to the mid nineties, in that period before Sony’s PlayStation was released to change the gaming landscape forever. In the arcades of April 1995, there is a lot of fighting and a lot of flying going on, as Midway drops the much anticipated third instalment in the dominating “kultural” force that is the Mortal Kombat series, Capcom once again combines martial arts and monsters in the Darkstalkers sequel Night Warriors, Namco takes to the skies with spectacle cab Air Combat 22 and Jaleco and NMK team up for a very late shoot ’em up sequel in the form of P-47 Aces.

At home we see SNES and Mega Drive owners especially still being well catered to with a slew of releases of varying quality, among which some reluctant support for the more or less maligned SEGA add-on known as the 32X, as the PlayStation approaches and Spain finally gets to savour the delights of Atari’s Jaguar system. Recovering from a strong early start that year, Hip Hop album releases are a bit thin on the ground, save for Mobb Deep’s seminal The Infamous. And in the world of guitar music, there are some major machinations taking place behind the scenes. Moviegoers, meanwhile, get to enjoy the comedic exploits of Martin Lawrence and Will Smith in Bad Boys and Ice Cube and Chris Tucker in Friday.

The result of all this is yet another meaty show brought to you by Video Wizards. Here’s to learning something new and sharing a laugh, a cry and a pensive moment or two in almost 6 more hours of prime nostalgic podcasting.

The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 20, L-R: Mortal Kombat 3, Air Combat 22, Night Warriors: Darkstalkers’ Revenge, P-47 Aces

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Baller of the Month Jingle composed by Yuli Anna and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2022 Yuli Anna, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Ride the Tiger (Akira’s Theme) – by Takenobu Mitsuyoshi, Takayuki Nakamura & Akiko Hashimoto for Virtua Fighter 2, 1994
  • Prologue – by Dan Forden for Mortal Kombat 3, 1995
  • The Soul Chamber – by Dan Forden for Mortal Kombat 3, 1995
  • If the Sky is Burnin’ Out – by Keiichi Okabe for Air Combat 22, 1995
  • Demitri Stage (Romania) – by Hideki Okugawa for Night Warriors: Darkstalkers’ Revenge, 1995
  • Stage 4 – by Manabu Namiki for P-47 Aces, 1995
  • Runner/AD2025 – by Norio Hanzawa for Alien Soldier, 1995
  • Shook Ones (Part II) – by Mobb Deep, 1995
  • Wontime – by Smif-N-Wessun (featuring Rockness Monsta), 1995
  • Distortion to Static – by The Roots, 1994
  • Return of da Baby Killa – by Brotha Lynch Hung (featuring Sicx), 1995
  • DAAAM! – by Tha Alkaholiks (featuring Les July), 1994
  • Put it On – by Big L, 1994
  • Goin’ Down – by Ol’ Dirty Bastard, 1995
  • Eye for a Eye (Your Beef is Mines) – by Mobb Deep (featuring Nas & Raekwon), 1995
  • Super-Charger Heaven – by White Zombie, 1995
  • Nothing Else Matters (Live in London, 1995) – by Metallica, 1992
  • Urban Discipline (Live at Dynamo Eindhoven, 1995) – by Biohazard, 1992
  • Sour Times – by Portishead, 1994
  • Some Might Say – by Oasis, 1995
  • Purple Medley – by Prince, 1995
  • The Bomb! (These Sounds Fall into My Mind) – by Kenny Dope presents… The Bucketheads, 1995
  • Self Esteem – by The Offspring, 1994
  • Keep Their Heads Ringin’ (Instrumental) – by Dr. Dre, 1995
  • Songs of Love (Theme for Father Ted) – by The Divine Comedy, 1995

Episode edited by: Michiel Kroder

And finally: our special thanks to テクノワールド奥州.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 20: March 1981

In episode number 20 of Video Wizards, we travel back the furthest yet: all the way to March 1981. With baby Ben keeping his parents awake all night with his lung and vocal chord exercises and Michiel celebrating his 5th birthday, the arcade game scene is typified by innovation and the establishing of brand new genres, with seminal releases like Scramble by Konami and Defender by Williams. Bally Midway are less interested in innovation, however, as they dare to release the plagiarism heavy Gorf, as developed by Dave Nutting Associates. And in the meantime, Namco introduce Rally-X, a vehicle based variation on their very own Pac-Man.

Home gaming is still ruled by the likes of the Atari f***ing 2600, but we also witness the release of Sir Clive’s ZX80 home computer, the imaginatively titled ZX81. Trash from the Classifieds morphs to The Classifieds Report, for a more dynamic dive into the sales ad pages of computer and video games magazines, Hip Hop music sees some truly foundational releases and in the world of guitars, the UK spearheads a new wave of domestic metal music production. Those looking to hit up the movie theaters are advised to stay home, however, as Sam Neil’s antichrist and Gary Coleman himself tag team terrorise the silver screen in this time period.

So you see, despite the early goings, there is no shortage of video games and popular culture to discover and discuss in March 1981. Enjoy 5 more hours of Video Wizards audio goodness!

Scramble

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14554195

Rally-X

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20490828

Defender

By http://www.retrocpu.com/mame/images/roms/d/defender_red_label.flyer.png, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=25426048

Gorf

By http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=flyer&db=videodb&id=460&image=1, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49864247
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 20, L-R: Scramble, Rally-X, Defender, Gorf

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Baller of the Month Jingle composed by Yuli Anna and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2022 Yuli Anna, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Main Theme – by Toshio Kai for Rally-X, 1981
  • Fantastic Voyage – by Lakeside, 1981
  • Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me) – by The Gap Band, 1980
  • Don’t Stop The Music – by Yarbrough & Peoples, 1980
  • Rapture – by Blondie, 1981
  • Put the Boogie in Your Body – by The Treacherous Three, 1981
  • Jazzy Sensation – by Afrika Bambaataa & The Jazzy 5, 1981
  • The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel – by Grandmaster Flash & The Furious 5, 1981
  • Wrathchild – by Iron Maiden, 1981
  • Bringin’ On the Heartbreak – by Def Leppard, 1981
  • In League with Satan – by Venom, 1981
  • Once in a Lifetime – by Talking Heads, 1981
  • Planet Earth – by Duran Duran, 1981
  • Kids in America – by Kim Wilde, 1981
  • In the Air Tonight – by Phil Collins, 1981
  • Embarassment – by Madness, 1980
  • Vienna – by Ultravox, 1981
  • Theme of Robin’s Nest – by Brian Bennett, 1981

Episode edited by: Juli Reed

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Patreon Announcement Minicast

In this special Video Wizards minicast, Ben and Michiel briefly look back at 2 years of the podcast and announce a new era, as we introduce our Patreon page. Learn more about the why, the how and the extras you get when you support us!

Enjoy this shorter conversation and check out our page at patreon.com/videowizards!

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 19: Winter 1990 / 1991

In the 19th episode of Video Wizards, we again travel back to 3 months in one single episode: December 1990 and January and February in 1991. And we find ourselves in a tumultuous time, with a lot of political twists and turns on the world stage and the arcade industry being on the brink of changing forever, with the impending release of Street Fighter II, in March.

As if they sense the big shift coming, Japanese STG (or shoot ’em up) developers push out a slew of releases: Taito releases the crazy passion project Gun Frontier and Technosoft bring their Mega Drive hit Thunder Force III to the arcades in the guise of Thunder Force AC, all following the likes of U.N. Squadron follow-up Carrier Air Wing by Capcom and Raiden by Seibu Kaihatsu.

But there is more than just shooting games in the arcades in this winter as we also get 8 player linked up sit down cab racing with Namco’s Final Lap 2, monster brawling action with Mutant Fighter by Data East, ecological activist fire fights and fisticuffs mayhem with Taito’s Growl and an oddball trackball affair called Rampart by our old friends at Atari… that actually kind of works!

Gaming in European homes, meanwhile, is undergoing a transition as well, as consoles such as the Master System, Mega Drive and even NES are gaining more of a foothold over the home computers, which are of course still very much around, making for a varied palette indeed.

In the world of music we see that the cold winter months off 1990/1991 are getting heated up by sexually explicit material from the likes of H.W.A., Madonna and Candyman and there is your usual quality selection of Hip Hop and Metal to go over as well. And in cinemas we can enjoy yet another varied palette in the form of Kindergarten Cop, Lionheart and Silence of the Lambs… with a nice glass of Chianti, of course!

We say this every time, but get comfortable and savour yet another record breaking Video Wizards episode, in terms of length, density and variety!

Thunder Force AC

Gun Frontier

By The Arcade Flyer Archive [1], Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12132391

Final Lap 2

By The poster art can or could be obtained from Namco., Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44536466

Mutant Fighter / Death Brade

Rampart

By http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=flyer&db=videodb&id=869&image=1, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23716993

Growl

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21348156
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 19, L-R-T-B: Thunder Force AC, Gun Frontier, Final Lap 2, Mutant Fighter/Death Brade, Rampart, Growl

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Baller of the Month Jingle composed by Yuli Anna and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2022 Yuli Anna, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Mission 3 – by Manami Matsumae for Carrier Airwing, 1990
  • Back to the Fire – by Toshiharu Yamanishi & Tomomi Ōtani for Thunder Force AC, 1990
  • Desert Mountain Storm – by Yasuhisa Watanabe & Hisayoshi Ogura for Gun Frontier, 1990
  • Paean of Body – by Hiroaki Yoshida & Akira Takemoto for Mutant Fighter, 1991
  • Select – by Brad Fuller & Don Diekneite for Rampart, 1991
  • RuNArk – by Yasuhisa Watanabe & Zuntata for Growl, 1991
  • World Tree 1 – by Jun Chikuma for Faxanadu, 1987
  • Justify My Love (Hip Hop Mix) (Instrumental) – by Andre Betts, 1990
  • Eat This – by H.W.A., 1990
  • Freaky Daze – by H.W.A., 1990
  • Funk Me – by H.W.A., 1990
  • 1-900-BITCHES – by H.W.A., 1990
  • All For One – by Brand Nubian, 1990
  • Hardcore – by EPMD (featuring Redman), 1990
  • Brothers on my Jock – by EPMD (featuring Redman), 1990
  • Step in the Arena – by Gang Starr, 1991
  • Come Do Me – by The Genius, 1990
  • You Could Be Mine – by Guns N’ Roses, 1991
  • Man in the Box – by Alice In Chains, 1991
  • These Are the Days of Our Lives – by Queen, 1991
  • Unbelievable – by EMF, 1990
  • Bring Your Daughter… to the Slaughter – by Iron Maiden, 1990
  • Crazy for You – by Madonna, 1985
  • Justify My Love – by Madonna, 1990
  • Knockin’ Boots – by Candyman, 1990
  • Can I Kick It? – by A Tribe Called Quest, 1990
  • Yo Home to Bel-Air – by DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince for The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air televised series, 1990

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 18: Autumn 1986

In the 18th episode of Video Wizards, we again travel back to 3 months in one single episode: September, October and November, all in the year 1986. And do things get more 1980s than this one? Perhaps not when arcade games like Out Run and movies like Top Gun see a release in this time period.

It’s a true golden era of mid eighties arcade gaming, with staples Bubble Bobble, Rampage and Arkanoid being wheeled onto floors everywhere. Meanwhile, we also see more hidden gems like Xain’d Sleena by Technōs and Legendary Wings by Capcom appear.

Gaming at home in Europe is dominated by the micros, such as the ZX Spectrum, Commodore C64 and the MSX, but Sega’s Master System and Nintendo’s NES are also quietly launched in this moment in time!

And what about music in the autumn of 1986? Well, it’s as varied as ever, with a lot of 80s R&B, metal, rap and rock crossovers and the usual dose of synth based pop blasting out of speakers around the world. In movie theaters meanwhile, it’s not just Top Gun, but also the very creepy Poltergeist 2 and indisputable sci-fi-horror-action mashup classic Aliens that find their way to the silver screen.

This lenghtiest Video Wizards episode yet of course also contains all the Local Dutch News, Trash from the Classifieds and Video Wizards Quiz shenanigans you’ve come to expect from us.

Get very, very comfortable as you follow Ben and Michiel all the way back to the golden autumn of 1986!

Out Run

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24082862

Xain'd Sleena

Bubble Bobble

Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8337934

Rampage

By From Arcadeflyers.com., Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27931911

Arkanoid

By The Arcade Flyer Archive, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21709056

Legendary Wings

By CAESAR, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15318116
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 18, L-R-T-B: Out Run, Xain’d Sleena, Bubble Bobble, Rampage, Arkanoid, Legendary Wings

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Magical Sound Shower – by Hiroshi Kawaguchi for Out Run, 1986
  • Lagto Soa – by ??? for Xain’d Sleena, 1986
  • Main Theme – by Tadashi Kimijima for Bubble Bobble, 1986
  • All Clear (Ending Theme) – by Hisayoshi Ogura for Arkanoid, 1986
  • Area 1 – by Tamayo Kawamoto for Legendary Wings, 1986
  • Main Theme – by Mark Cooksey for Ghosts’n Goblins (Commodore C64 version), 1986
  • The Rain – by Oran “Juice” Jones, 1986
  • Hollywood Boulevard – by L.A. Dream Team, 1986
  • No Sleep Till Brooklyn – by Beastie Boys, 1986
  • Open the Gate – by Vortex, 1986
  • Stranger in a Strange Land – by Iron Maiden, 1986
  • Ain’t Nothin’ Goin’ On but the Rent – by Gwen Guthrie, 1986
  • Walk This Way – by Run D.M.C. (featuring Aerosmith), 1986
  • We Don’t Have to Take Our Clothes Off – by Jermaine Stewart, 1986
  • When I Think of You – by Janet Jackson, 1986
  • What’s the Colour of Money? – by Hollywood Beyond, 1986
  • Love Can’t Turn Around – by Farley “Jackmaster” Funk & Jesse Saunders (featuring Darryl Pandy), 1986
  • Theme for The Equalizer, by Stuart Copeland, 1985

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Podcasts, Player FM or via RSS.

VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 17: Summer 1996

In this episode of Video Wizards, we ambitiously travel back to 3 months in one single episode: June, July and August, all in the year 1996. In this Olympic summer, arcade floors are dominated by 3D fighting games like Last Bronx, Star Gladiator and errr… Fighters’ Impact by Taito. SNK, meanwhile, represent two dimensions with the fantastic The King of Fighters ’96 and SEGA take the beat ’em up genre into 3D for Die Hard Arcade. And then there is Konami, riding the current events wave with the happy button mashy athletics mini game fest Hyper Athlete, which nicely derives from their lineage of Track & Field games.

While the Nintendo 64 and its killer app Super Mario 64 see a release in Japan, SEGA is already fighting a losing battle against Sony’s PlayStation monster, over here in Europe. This while the seismic Quake finds its way to those that play games on their personal computers.

With some exceptionally trashy chart music assaulting our ears, we find refuge in the import record shops, where one great Hip Hop album after another can be lifted from the crates. Heltah Skeltah and Jay-Z make their debut and OutKast release their confident and unapologetically eclectic sophomore joint. Meanwhile, 2pac drops the extra inflammatory diss record Hit ‘Em Up, which unfortunately does not help to lead him off his destructive path.

And then there are 2 major summer block busting movies we’re looking at, namely Independence Day and The Rock, as well as the more slow burning, but more enduring Matilda and The Cable Guy. Plus there is all the Local Dutch News, Trash from the Classifieds and Video Wizards Quiz material you’re used to from us.

Follow Ben and Michiel on this enormous marathon of a Video Wizards podcast episode and warm yourself in the sunrays of the 1996 summer!

Star Gladiator

Hyper Athlete

Last Bronx

By http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=flyer&db=videodb&id=587&image=1, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18913027

The King of Fighters '96

By SNK - https://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=thumbs&db=videodb&id=4879, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62790012

Dynamite Deka

Fighters Impact
The top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 17, L-R-T-B: Star Gladiator, Hyper Athlete, Last Bronx, The King of Fighters ’96, Dynamite Deka/Die Hard Arcade, Fighters’ Impact

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Federal Headquarters (Elevator) – by Isao Abe, Yūko Takehara & Michio Sakurai (XTC) for Star Gladiator, 1996
  • Score Board – by Kosuke Soeda for Hyper Athlete, 1996
  • Lust Subway (Yoko’s Stage) – by Tomoyuki Kawamura for Last Bronx, 1996
  • Arashi no Saxophone 2 – by Hideki Asanaka, Kazuhiro Nishida, Masahiko Hataya, Toshio Shimizu, Yasumasa Yamada, Yasuo Yamate, Brother-Hige, Akihiro Uchida & Miwa for The King of Fighters ’96, 1996
  • Track 3 – by Howard Drossin for Dynamite Deka, 1996
  • Be Cool (Sanson’s Stage) – by Yasuhisa Watanabe for Fighters’ Impact, 1996
  • Street (TJ Combo’s Theme) – by Robin Beanland for Killer Instinct 2, 1996
  • Main Theme – by Kōji Kondō for Super Mario 64, 1996
  • Drop a Gem on ‘Em – by Mobb Deep, 1996
  • Music Makes Me High – by Lost Boyz, 1996
  • 8 Steps to Perfection – by Company Flow, 1996
  • My Kinda N***a – by Heather B (featuring M.O.P.), 1996
  • Undastand – by Heltah Skeltah, 1996
  • Dead Presidents – by Jay-Z, 1996
  • Stakes is High – by De La Soul, 1996
  • Get a Hold – by A Tribe Called Quest, 1996
  • Ridin’ Dirty – by UGK, 1996
  • Elevators (Me & You) – by OutKast, 1996
  • Hit ‘Em Up – by 2Pac (featuring Outlawz), 1996
  • Mama Said – by Metallica, 1996
  • Nancy Boy – by Placebo, 1996
  • Call It in the Air – by Jimmy Eat World, 1996
  • Got me Wrong (Unplugged) – by Alice in Chains, 1996
  • 3 Lions – by Skinner, Baddiel & Lightning Seeds, 1996
  • Born Slippy – by Underworld, 1996
  • Trash – by Suede, 1996
  • Fu-Gee-La – by The Fugees, 1996
  • Fastlove – by George Michael, 1996
  • Twisted – by Keith Sweat (featuring Kut Klose), 1996
  • Return of the Mack – by Mark Morrison, 1996

And finally: our special thanks to テクノワールド奥州.

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VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 16: May 1987

The hits keep on coming as the Video Wizards travel back to the heydays of ninja related crimes in May 1987 and discuss monumental arcade games like Double Dragon, Taito’s Rastan Saga and Super Hang-On. But there is also Konami’s Combat School, which failed to prepare Ben and Michiel for its final level in the White House, and the rather anticlimactic The Real Ghostbusters by Data East to delve into, as well as talk of Karnov, Contra and Bionic Commando.

European home gaming in May 1987 is all about the micros as remarkable games like The Sentinel, Saboteur 2 and Ranarama see a release, whereas Nintendo’s 8-bit hitter is still a would-be import gamer’s dream. In the world of music Guns’N Roses are about to change Metal forever and in the world of cinema Axel Foley makes his return for more sun drenched action and comedy in Beverly Hills, while Michael Dudikoff and Steve James bring it all the way back with the silly shinobi stylings of American Ninja 2.

Brace yourself for more than 5 hours of new Video Wizards podcast content and listen out for the announcement at the end to get the lowdown on what’s next for the show!

Rastan Saga

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21618006

Super Hang-On

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27913139

Combat School

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15373069

The Real Ghostbusters
Other top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 16, L-R: Rastan Saga, Super Hang-On, Combat School, The Real Ghostbusters

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • Opening – by Kazunaka Yamane for Double Dragon, 1987
  • Mission 2: Industrial Area Riot – by Kazunaka Yamane for Double Dragon, 1987
  • Overworld Theme – by Naoto Yagishita & Masahiko Takaki for Rastan Saga, 1987
  • Outride a Crisis – by Katsuhiro Hayashi & Kouichi Namiki for Super Hang-On, 1987
  • Main Theme – by ??? & Ray Parker Jr. for The Real Ghostbusters, 1987
  • Demo Theme – by Shinichi Sakamoto for Psychic 5, 1987
  • Main Theme – by Rob Hubbard for Shockway Rider, 1987
  • Sign O’ The Times – by Prince, 1987
  • Don’t Disturb This Groove – by The System, 1987
  • Head to Toe – by Lisa Lisa & Cult Jam, 1987
  • Nightmares – by Dana Dane, 1987
  • Girls, Girls, Girls – by Mötley Crüe, 1987
  • Twilight of the Gods – by Helloween, 1987
  • Deadly Peril – by Defender, 1987
  • Big Love – by Fleetwood Mac, 1987
  • Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now – by Starship, 1987
  • If You Let Me Stay – by Terence Trent D’Arby, 1987
  • Crockett’s Theme – by Jan Hammer, 1987
  • Lean on Me – by Club Nouveau, 1987
  • Respectable – by Mel & Kim, 1987
  • Right on Track – by The Breakfast Club, 1987
  • Kleine Jodeljongen – by Manke Nelis, 1987
  • The DJ Kat Show Theme Song – by ??? for The DJ Kat Show, 1986

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

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VIDEO WIZARDS PODCAST – Episode 15: April 1992

In this episode of the Video Wizards Podcast we’re traveling back to April 1992 to an arcade landscape that differs wildly from the one we left in the last episode. In the wake of 1991’s Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, we find the scene reinvigorated, with big budget games and showy machines occupying the floors and the 6-player, double screen behemoth cabinet of Konami’s X-men taking center stage. Meanwhile, the first named revision of Capcom’s Street Fighter II keeps rivalries and competitions heated and Konami introduce another licensed machine with G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero. More niche video game experiences come in ADK’s bizarre hilarious Ninja Commando and the prickly-yet-explosive Bubble Bobble-like Saboten Bombers by NMK.

In the home, all eyes are on that 16-bit powerhouse called the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which sees its launch in the UK this month. In other geographically pinpointed goings on, John Woo releases his action fest master piece Hard Boiled to Hong Kong movie theaters and across the Atlantic Ocean, the music genre of Hip-Hop is deeply impacted by the 1992 Los Angeles riots.

All that and your monthly dose of Local Dutch News, Trash from the Classifieds and Video Wizards Quizzing is here for you, with more than 5 hours of audio goodness to indulge in.

Street Fighter II: Champion Edition

Saboten Bombers

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41425168

G.I. Joe

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24701778

Ninja Commando

By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61298339
Other top billing arcade games of the era we discuss on Episode 15, L-R: Street Fighter II: Champion Edition, Saboten Bombers, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, Ninja Commando

Show theme tune: NEON CITY, composed by Ed 「イートレム」 Tremblay for Mudprints Music and licensed exclusively to The Video Wizards Podcast, ©2019 Mudprints Music, all rights reserved.

Other music used in this episode:

  • TV Theme Style (The Winner) – by Colin Thomson, 2018
  • All That X-men – by Seiichi Fukami for X-men, 1992
  • Boss – by Seiichi Fukami for X-men, 1992
  • U.S.A. (Balrog’s Theme) – by Yoko Shimomura for Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, 1991
  • Title Theme – by ??? for Saboten Bombers, 1992
  • Player Select – by Tsutomu Ogura & Kenichiro Fukui for G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, 1992
  • Japan (Civil War Era) – by ??? for Ninja Commando, 1992
  • Red & Yellow – by Zuntata for Metal Black, 1991
  • Title Theme – by Koji Kondo for Super Mario World, 1990
  • Mic Checka – by DAS EFX, 1992
  • Cop Killer – by Body Count, 1992
  • In my Neighborhood – by Spice 1, 1992
  • That Sickness – by X-Raided (featuring Brotha Lynch Hung, Big-O, Kaos, CYCO), 1992
  • They Want EFX – by DAS EFX, 1992
  • Deep Cover – by Dr. Dre (featuring Snoop Doggy Dogg), 1984
  • La Schmoove – by Fu-Schnickens, 1992
  • Duck Down – by BDP, 1992
  • T.R.O.Y. (They Reminisce Over You) – by Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth, 1992
  • Come As You Are – by Nirvana, 1992
  • Monster – by L7, 1992
  • The Dark War Has Begun – by Bestial Summoning, 1992
  • Be Quick or Be Dead – by Iron Maiden, 1992
  • I Love Your Smile – by Shanice, 1991
  • Under the Bridge – by Red Hot Chili Peppers, 1992
  • We Got a Love Thang – by CeCe Peniston, 1992
  • O.P.P. – by Naughty by Nature, 1991
  • Red Car Boogie – by Joo Rita for the motion picture Hard Boiled, 1992
  • Heartbeat – by Nick Berry, 1992

And finally: our special thanks to Andy Hofle.

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